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20121219
20121219
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would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box o
benches. those of us to understand the impact of the supreme court and what it can do or on june, we know that having asian-americans on the federal bench is a line up for appointments to the supreme court. thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to say that silicon valley is the birthplace of high-tech. silicon valley is the birthplace of norm. five minutes? thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, congressmen. we would have extended the five minutes if we got a karaoke's song. >> this event would have not been possible by the financial contributions of our sponsors. we want to thank chevron corp., wells fargo, mcdonald's, academy of arts university, at&t, southwest airlines. if you have not entered their raffled yet, do so later tonight. comcast, walmart, verizon, moon star restaurant. >> we go from the greatest karaoke's singer in the house of congress to the self-proclaimed worst karaoke singing in public office. i would like to introduce california state controller, serving his second term. he takes a hard-line and took immediate action to weed out waste, fraud, and abu
we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its term but on the ground how do you operationalize it, those things in the public school who are working so hard to meet the required mandates. schools are driven by mandates, academic achievement, achievement, enrollment. but the conditions in which the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a sc
and in each of the domains think of something in all of them in the last 24 hours that you had to use, that you had to activate in relationships with the co-workers or spouses and these are different life skills and there is the area of responsible decision making and comes into play when you have to figure out what to do when you have a problem, so you can probably just look at that and "oh yes, i see where the connections would be" and i would like to kind of point out because we are talking about bullying today -- one of the things i love -- i don't know if rosylyn is still in the room but she talked about a specific example. this is an example of what a teacher should be able to do if she sees something in the hallway and described this whole process and when i was listening to that i was thinking oh my gosh in every category that person would have to be very socially emotionally competent. you need the awareness to know something is going on. you need that empathy to compel you do something about t you need the management skills to approach that situation calmly and not be ove
to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidelines, but also you could go organic, you could go loca
toll energy center. i'm standing in front of a model of a home. this is one of the tools we use here to assess solar energy. five years ago i was in a position similar to that of many of you. i was a homeowner thinking about solar electricity for my home. i had to answer a bunch of questions. one, does this stuff work? would it work on my home and most importantly, can i afford it? well, i did the research. i bought a system. now i get to share that knowledge and that experience with you. for the next 30 minutes, we'll have a class in solar basics and we'll go out in the field and see an actual solar system being installed. 30 minutes, solar basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, r
francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up is focused on communal table. yo
expected gives us some flexibility to do some of the projects that we have been delaying. we will have a special meeting in february to do the, to pass the final budget that's going to be submitted to the mayor's office and the submission date is february 21st. so we have to keep a kind of tight schedule in order to be able to meet that date. >> thank you, deputy director. >> item 8b, update on proposed legislation. >>. >> good morning, commissioners, bill strong with legislative and public affairs. rethe earlier discussion with supervisor mar's aide, nick, on the grab bars, he did reconfirm before he left the hearing room that our permit legislation will be heard at land use on february 14. it's taken a bit longer than expected but we're looking for a positive recommendation from the committee to go to the full board, so i think that will probably get approved in january by the full board. as you know there is legislation that supervisor khu is still working on that's kind of a part 2 of the amendments he made earlier to the apartment convention ordinance and this one has to deal wi
english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the
it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or
thank you for being with us. hope to see you soon. >> thank you all for coming, i would like to really briefly introduce bonnie angle with the breast cancer fund, she is going to do a presentation for you on prevention, ways to preventolin ks of chemicals in breast cancer and i'll let her talk about the rest, bonnie, thank you for coming. >> alright. thank you all so much for being here today. i'm very excited to be able to give this presentation to you, unfortunately, i was expecting to have a co-presenter who had a minor accident and visited the emergency room this morning instead of visiting us, so we have plenty of folks from the breast cancer fund and other groups on hand to answer questions, but we are missing our policy geru unfortunately, i don't know how much this audience is familiar with it but we've also been meeting and talking about doing a study of exposures among women firefighters in particular, and so we have some members of that team talking about that here, sharl patton is back there, give a wave, and did rachel step out already? and rachel thought she was
and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the unite
this on top of it. anyway. i'm really frustrated. >> ms. shaw, very briefly, can you give us any inclination on what you're trying to do to correct anything here? >>> we're working on it. i'm working on it with mr. [speaker not understood]. we're getting a lot done. which met with the city attorney yesterday. it was a very productive meeting. and you know, we're getting actually quite a bit done. and, so, the fire damage building, a lot of the pud problems on that building are being corrected. * they were corrected over the years. i had a contested case. i lost over a million dollars because of that. it was a struggle. i mean it was one struggle after another. i had a lawyer, david [speaker not understood], little colorful. my bankruptcy attorney is now in jail for first degree murder. and then i walk into the housing department after i close that case. so, i've been through one horrible situation after another. in my life, but i can't stand this any more with housing, i really can't * . when i came to see you, you asked rosemary if she was targeting me. i came a couple days later and you t
. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they wanted to have as their economic future. and try to -- we had 13,that pal over the state and trying to find an economic vision for the state county by county. how do we become more pro- business? we heard people wanted to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right wor
the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and .hank you very much for joining >> (roll call). we have a quorum and the next item on the agenda is president's announcements. >> thank you, madam secretary. obviously welcome everyone here today, the last meeting before the end of the year. we will wish everybody happy holidays. so what we have is acting director tom huey participated in a media briefing at the site of the hacker pool house with the director of recreation and parks, phil ginsburg. dbi acting director huey signed an emergency order early letter this month when a fire caused sufficient structural damage to make the building an imminent public safety hazard. demolition is currently underway. bill pointed out to me a very interesting article in the front of the san francisco chronicle today is good to give you h
away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway. i was in chicago in may and already the strike talk was coming up and talking to some of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and
to address us on the vexing issue of bullying. it is my pleasure to introduce the mayor of san francisco, ed lee. . >> thank you, ann, for that wonderful introduction and i don't know where you got the ease of coming to the mayor's ofrs, there was no ease on that. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining together here at the presidio with all the different agencies. i see phil ginsburg, i know bill is around, others from our da office, richard caranza and others from the women's status as well and the district attorneys from the various counties, the school administrators and instructors and superintendents from other counties as well, as well as our community-based agencies that are so invaluable it all of us. this is a very important topic and it's one that our u.s. attorney, melinda hague and i helped spearhead yesterday with 800 students who came together who watch an incredible film by lee hirsch i've heard the wonderful reports from the kids, seen their laughter and their tears. we are going to honor your making that film by doing what we need to do to stop bullying across the co
and do that outreach. >> thank you, and thank you for putting this forward. many of us were involved in the capss discussions over the years and the more you know, the more you realize how urgently this is needed. >> thank you. to that point, one of the things i'm excited about is i'm involved with not only the capss project and the bpr project, i've seen things go through the city where you end up with a very nice-looking report like this and it sits on the desk and gathers dust. with the support of the building inspection commission i'm happy to address any concerns you feel we may not be meeting or not addressing and have that conversation any time. >> commissioner lee. >> thank you. i want to express my appreciation that you are doing the outreach and talking to the schools and getting them to understand that they may have to have a retrofit project in the future, because i can understand that some of these projects would end up costing a lot of money and there would be a lot of planning before the school actually starts construction to retrofit. but my question was actually a
to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human part, that is the part that should have consequences and not be ignored. otherwise the legislation really isn't doing what it's supposed to do, so thank you all very much. i really give a shout out to san francisco unified because they have been very, very on top
to use the existing van spacings that are in the buildings for parking, for the van parking, and it would meet the equivalent -- it would be equivalent to facilitation for existing buildings the way we do it now. that's really what the language is about. >> okay, thank you for updating us on that. do we have to take action on that? no? okay. >> i believe there is action authority, wasn't listed that way, but it is an action item. >> so we'll take public comment first, then. >> is there public comment on item 7? seeing none, is there a motion to approve the administrative bulletin ab-007? >> if there's no objection. >> someone --. >> i move to approve. >> second. >> there is a motion and a second and i'll do the roll call vote. the motion carries. >> item no. 7, discussion on progress of recruitment for executive search firm regarding hiring of a permanent director for the department. >> okay, commissioners, thank you. we have a short presentation to hear ted yamagaki was supposed to be here but unfortunately couldn't make it so we as per your directions at the last meeting, we went b
it out and make a proposal, but the whole point is that i don't want to see us implementing this and then have the permitting issue be a discouragement to the property owners. we want these people to come forward to get the permits and get it done correctly. we don't want to discourage them. i can see where the property owner would say, gee, it will cost me more to get a permit than it actually costs to do the work. >> i would be more than happy to work with director hue and carla and dan lowry on a standard permit fee so it's consistent with the building code fee schedule. we can definitely look at that and see what we can come up with for possibly a standard fee for a simple application, but it will depend upon the estimated cost of work, et cetera. but we can definitely look at that. i think that's a great idea. >> obviously it has to match the -- this is probably getting off track here. i know commissioner -- one of the supervisors had a signed ordinance and you got a free permit if you did something within a certain number of months, i don't know. when we do co
to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorrow and investing that savings and. that is what we have to do. i think it is a tough order of this matter of innovation is part of it. but also getting us to come together. we can talk about regulation and pension and taxes and the government. a lot of that is [inaudible] a survey said housing prices are too high and that is a negative factor on recruitment. i thought, maybe we can bring the prices down. foreclosure works magic. i do not think you want that. you want rising wealth which could translate into a rising houses -- housing prices. you can increase density and breakdown similar rules, you get more people. there's a lot of things. as i drove down here from oakland cut -- oakland, i saw those cars in the ordinary lanes. one pe
's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans right now and suicide is complex and we cannot send the message -- there is a lot of fear out there right now that bullying leads to suicide and suic
the bullying of your fists but it's the bullying that can come through the use of twitter, through the use of other social media. we did a case, again a hate crimes case involving an individual who called himself devilfish who over the internet was sending death threats to the heads of the national council of irasa to other organizations that had the audacity to october on behalf of immigrants. and we prosecuted him. you described one just now, that is not an isolated incident. you know that old addage, sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never hurt me, i categorically reject that. we have seen kids quite literally take their own lives as a result of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the departm
that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can urriculum in that way. but you certainly have seen superintendent caranza happened about what happens with the kinds of conversations that happen with the movie bully and there are can urriculum packages being developed. i had visions, gary, to think about how if folks decided -- and we don't play in this -- but if folks decided there could be a class on this, how you teach, life skills class, right? if we try to make a one-size fits all click approach that doesn't really take people from where they are and get them to where they need to go. i have seen life skills work well and i have seen students literally filling out mcdonald's applications in their life skills class. so you can't just quickly eradicate and we can't just think about this in an isolated silo the link, for example, that has been alluded
the bullying takes place begins to change and it's not acceptable so we use a combination of hard power and soft power. >> jeff thank you. [applause] two to three minutes goes really fast and that was a little over, just fyi. superintendent. >> don't start the clock yet. thanks. again i want to thank everyone for being here this morning and this morning i said "welcome to a sunny day in september" and many of you didn't believe me and i want to thank you all for being here and in my comments at the beginning i spoke of the wonderful experience and having 3,000 opportunities yesterday see "bully" the movie. i spoke of all of the administrators seeing "bully" when they came back from summer break and develop their plans on their campuses here, so i would like to go deeper and talk about a couple of things and before that i appreciate what rosylyn and the previous panel said about the term "bullying" and run the risk of it meaning something generic and meaningless and the word of the day, so let's talk about what it is. it's assault. sometimes it's aggravated assault. it's kidnapp
on any page, and they can come right to us, but we've invented this thing, which is not the most brilliant invention but working well and the social resolution way to solve bullying and other harassing content, so we created a flow where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could
is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the community and now we have to continue to pull ourselves up and help our other daughter and the challenges of raising and parenting another child. you know, we can't just pull up in a shell. she has the right to have a childhood. she deserves to go to go to c
. this is san francisco's official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree and over 100 years old, and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> five, four, three, two, one! >> yay! >> i'm your host of "culturewire," and today, here at electric works in san francisco. nice to see you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around? >> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco was in need of all these different services? >> it came from stepping out of graduate school in 1972. i wrote a little thing about how this is an idea, how our world should work. it should have printmaking, archiving, a gallery. it should have a retail store. in 1972, i w
and it can go wherever it wants to go? everyone who has donated to it could use it, host it, share it. >> for quite a great deal of team she was hired in 2005, she struggled with finding the correct and appropriate visual expression. >> it was a bench at one point. it was a darkened room at another point. but the theme always was a theme of how do we call people's attention to the issue of speci species extinction. >> many exhibits do make long detailed explanations about species decline and biology of birds and that is very useful for lots of purposes. but i think it is also important to try to pull at the strings inside people. >> missing is not just about specific extinct or endangered species. it is about absence and a more fundamental level of not knowing what we are losing and we need to link species loss to habitat loss and really focuses much on the habitat. >> of course the overall mission of the academy has to do with two really fundamental and important questions. one of which is the nature of life. how did we get here? the second is the challenge of sustainability. if we a
history is amazing. >> this is a momentous occasion for us to be able to actually have this opportunity to have equal rights. >> we have been together for 14 years. everyone is so welcoming. it's been all set up and people have guided us from step to step. it's been easy. there was live music. people are so friendly and excited. so excited for us. >> it's really great. >> yeah. >> and salvador is party a here to known as party a. >> on the out it looks pretty simple. you come in, you made your appointment. you pay. you go here for your license. you got there to get married. you go there if you want to purchase a certified copy. behind the scenes, there was just this monumental just mountain of work, the details into everything that we had to do and we quickly realized that we were not ready to issue the numbers of licenses that people are anticipating that we would need to issue. we definitely did not want people waiting in long lines. this is somebody's wedding. you want to be able to plan and invite your family and friends. know what time you are able to get your marriage license, kn
walk out feeling great. >> if you feel comfortable using computers and you have patience, we want you on our team. >> would you show me how to type? >> [speaking in spanish]. >> will you help me learn more? >> welcome to the beautiful historic tea gardens, the oldest in the united states. this provides visitors from around the world to enjoy the natural beauty, harmony and tranquility of the park in the heart of golden gate park. >> as you can see the garden has a wide variety of plants here, almost a hundred species from japan and china and bamboo and native plants. >> they're trimmed to a human scale so you relate to them on a human level. >> this is one of my favorite sections and you can see the goarnlrous maples by the bamboo back drop and especially beautiful in the fall when the leaves start changing colors. just around the corner from maple lane this little garden is called a zen garden, a dry landscape garden and constructed here in 1953. this was originally designed by zen monks for the ground. their main purpose was to create a trairchg tranquil setting for the monks. t
the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not shown much. now let's look at other aspects of electric works operation. let's go to the bookstore. >> ok. >> in all seriousness, here we are in your store. this is the first space you encounter when you come in off the street. it has evolved since you open here into the most amazingly curious selection of things. >> this was the project for the
for the heaters. i get permits all the time because as i said, i'm used to dealing with the building department and very level headed people. anyway, what happened was -- >> i'm sorry, it's 7 minutes, time is up. >>> i'm holding here -- they deny that i asked them, when i filed this appeal, i didn't know i had 7 minutes. >> five matters? it's up to you. they're your rules and procedures. because there's five separate matters, the department has presented in one, i'm not sure it's fair to limit her to the 7 minutes. >> okay. >> but it's up to you. >> three more minutes. >>> okay. anyway, i asked them when i filed this appeal about those three cases. and she looked it up on the computer and said i had never cleared any case on that building. and anyway, i came down here the next day and one of the revocations is on file. i cleared three and it's on each one. it's number 167 8 06. and what happened, i found out they destroyed all the case downstairs two years ago after [speaker not understood]. so, some things did not make it onto the computer, the records. i'm talking about the records department
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